Ipatiev House - Romanov Memorial - The tragic end of the last Czar of Russia
Ipatiev House - Romanov Memorial - The tragic end of the last Czar of Russia

 

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Ipatiev house, walkthrough

 

Ipatiev House - Romanov Memorial - The tragic end of the last Czar of Russia - Nikolai Ipatiev
Nicholas Ipatiev
(1869-1938)

A former captain, a retired engineer, and an important local factory owner, he was the son of a Muscovite architecht and he had studied in Engineer's Institue of St. Petersburg. He had been involved in the construction of the Perm-Koungour-Ekaterinberg railway and he also delegated by the Duma of the city. His brother Vladimir, who left the USSR in 1930 for the United States, became one of the most famous chemists of the 20th centruy.
In April 1918, the Bolsheviks chose Nichola's house in Ekaterinburg to use it as a jail for the Romanovs.
A little while after the execution of the Romanovs in July and before the White Army's arrival, his house was given back to him by local authorities. Shortly after, Nicholas Ipatiev emigrated first to Japan and then to Europe before his death in Prague on April 22, 1923. His tomb can be found in the city's cemetary.

 

      When it was decided to imprison the Romanov family in Ekaterinburg, the Bolsheviks chose a house located in the historical center of the city on Voznessenski Street to be used as a jail : Ipatiev house, after its owner's name, Nicholas Ipatiev. This man lived here with his family on the first floor of the house and used the ground floor rooms of his house as offices to his metallurgy business. It was a spacious (18 by 31 square meters), modern, and comfortable house with electricity, a telephone, and even a bathroom and lavatory. The house also had a terrace and a little garden with some trees and bushes like poplar, birch, and lime.

     The house was built on ground with a double slope and part of the ground floor rooms on Voznessenski Street were almost in the basement.

     The house was built in 1897 by a man named Andrei Redikortsev, who was an engineer in the iron mines. But Andrei Redikortsev was involved in corruption cases and was forced to sell his house to another man, IG Charaviev. This man also worked in platinum mines in the west of the Urals. Later, in 1908, IG Charaviev sold the house to Nicholas Ipatiev for 6000 rubles.

     Ten years later, on Saturday, the 27th of April, the Bolsheviks asked Nicholas Ipatiev to leave his house with two days notice after having stored his belongings in a closed, small room on the ground floor. On the map, it's the little room next to the cellar room.

     After Nicholas Ipatiev's departure, the Bolsheviks built a high wooden fence all round the Ipatiev house, transforming the house into a fortress. The house had become "the house of special purpose," ready to welcome the Romanov family...


Ipatiev house View #01


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Ipatiev house View #07

 

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